Journal cover Journal topic
Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
GMD cover
Executive editors:
Julia
 
Hargreaves
,
Lutz
 
Gross
,
David
 
Ham
,
Astrid
 
Kerkweg
,
Didier
 
Roche
 &
Rolf
 
Sander

Geoscientific Model Development (GMD) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and public discussion of the description, development, and evaluation of numerical models of the Earth system and its components. The following manuscript types can be considered for peer-reviewed publication:

  • geoscientific model descriptions, from statistical models to box models to GCMs;
  • development and technical papers, describing developments such as new parameterizations or technical aspects of running models such as the reproducibility of results;
  • new methods for assessment of models, including work on developing new metrics for assessing model performance and novel ways of comparing model results with observational data;
  • papers describing new standard experiments for assessing model performance or novel ways of comparing model results with observational data;
  • model experiment descriptions, including experimental details and project protocols;
  • full evaluations of previously published models.

More details can be found in manuscript types and the journal editorial (compiled by the executive editors).

"I believe that the time is ripe for significantly better documentation of programs, and that we can best achieve this by considering programs to be works of literature."
(Donald E. Knuth, Literate Programming, 1984)

"Essentially, all models are wrong, but some are useful."
(George E. P. Box, Robustness in the strategy of scientific model building, 1979)

Highlight articles

A global aerosol reanalysis product named the Japanese Reanalysis for Aerosol (JRAero) was constructed by the Meteorological Research Institute (MRI) of the Japan Meteorological Agency. The reanalysis employs a global aerosol transport model developed by MRI and a two-dimensional variational data assimilation method. It assimilates maps of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from MODIS onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites every 6 h and has a TL159 horizontal resolution (approximately 1.1°×1.1°).

Keiya Yumimoto, Taichu Y. Tanaka, Naga Oshima, and Takashi Maki

The CarbonTracker Data Assimilation Shell (CTDAS) is the new modular implementation of the CarbonTracker Europe (CTE) data assimilation system. We present and document CTDAS and demonstrate its ability to estimate global carbon sources and sinks. We present the latest CTE results including the distribution of the carbon sinks over the hemispheres and between the land biosphere and the oceans. We show the versatility of CTDAS with an overview of the wide range of other applications.

Ingrid T. van der Laan-Luijkx, Ivar R. van der Velde, Emma van der Veen, Aki Tsuruta, Karolina Stanislawska, Arne Babenhauserheide, Hui Fang Zhang, Yu Liu, Wei He, Huilin Chen, Kenneth A. Masarie, Maarten C. Krol, and Wouter Peters

The Polar SWIFT model is a fast scheme for calculating the chemistry of stratospheric ozone depletion in polar winter. It is intended for use in global climate models (GCMs) and Earth system models (ESMs) to enable the simulation of mutual interactions between the ozone layer and climate.

Ingo Wohltmann, Ralph Lehmann, and Markus Rex

As part of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) organized under the auspices of the World Climate Research Programme's (WCRP) Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM) many hundreds of climate researchers, working with modeling centres around the world, will share, compare and analyze the latest outcomes of global climate models. These model products will fuel climate research for the next 5 to 10 years, while its careful analysis will form the basis for future climate assessments and negotiations.

David Carlson, Veronika Eyring, Narelle van der Wel, and Gaby Langendijk

Our ability to model the chemical and thermodynamic processes that lead to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation is thought to be hampered by the complexity of the system. In this proof of concept study, the ability to train supervised methods to predict electron impact ionisation (EI) mass spectra for the AMS is evaluated to facilitate improved model evaluation. The study demonstrates the use of a methodology that would be improved with more training data and data from simple mixed systems.

David O. Topping, James Allan, M. Rami Alfarra, and Bernard Aumont

Recent articles

News

New institutional agreement between the PIK and Copernicus Publications

24 Aug 2017

Authors from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) will profit from a new institutional agreement with Copernicus Publications starting 23 August 2017. The agreement which is valid for the first author enables a direct settlement of article processing charges (APCs) between the PIK and the publisher.

Update of publication policy

04 Jul 2017

The updated publication policy now is extended by the journal's open access statement, its archiving and indexing scheme, and explicit policies on corrections and retractions.

Revision of editors', referees', and authors' obligations

29 Jun 2017

The general obligations for editors, referees, and authors have been revised to give advice for the appropriate handling of literature suggestions.

Publications Copernicus