Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 4.252 IF 4.252
  • IF 5-year value: 4.890 IF 5-year 4.890
  • CiteScore value: 4.49 CiteScore 4.49
  • SNIP value: 1.539 SNIP 1.539
  • SJR value: 2.404 SJR 2.404
  • IPP value: 4.28 IPP 4.28
  • h5-index value: 40 h5-index 40
  • Scimago H index value: 51 Scimago H index 51
GMD cover
Executive editors:
Julia
 
Hargreaves
,
Lutz
 
Gross
,
David
 
Ham
,
Astrid
 
Kerkweg
,
Didier
 
Roche
 &
Rolf
 
Sander
Geoscientific Model Development (GMD) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and public discussion of the description, development, and evaluation of numerical models of the Earth system and its components. The following manuscript types can be considered for peer-reviewed publication:
  • geoscientific model descriptions, from statistical models to box models to GCMs;
  • development and technical papers, describing developments such as new parameterizations or technical aspects of running models such as the reproducibility of results;
  • new methods for assessment of models, including work on developing new metrics for assessing model performance and novel ways of comparing model results with observational data;
  • papers describing new standard experiments for assessing model performance or novel ways of comparing model results with observational data;
  • model experiment descriptions, including experimental details and project protocols;
  • full evaluations of previously published models.

More details can be found in manuscript types and the journal editorial (compiled by the executive editors).

"I believe that the time is ripe for significantly better documentation of programs, and that we can best achieve this by considering programs to be works of literature." (Donald E. Knuth, Literate Programming, 1984)

"Essentially, all models are wrong, but some are useful." (George E. P. Box, Robustness in the strategy of scientific model building, 1979)

Highlight articles

In the same way that the fruit fly or the yeast cell serve as model systems in biology, climate scientists use a range of computer models to gain a fundamental understanding of our climate system. These models range from extremely simple models that can run on your phone to those that require supercomputers. Sympl and climt are packages that make it easy for climate scientists to build a hierarchy of such models using Python, which facilitates easy to read and self-documenting models.

Joy Merwin Monteiro, Jeremy McGibbon, and Rodrigo Caballero

MPAS-Albany Land Ice (MALI) is a new variable-resolution land ice model that uses unstructured grids on a plane or sphere. MALI is built for Earth system modeling on high-performance computing platforms using existing software libraries. MALI simulates the evolution of ice thickness, velocity, and temperature, and it includes schemes for simulating iceberg calving and the flow of water beneath ice sheets and its effect on ice sliding. The model is demonstrated for the Antarctic ice sheet.

Matthew J. Hoffman, Mauro Perego, Stephen F. Price, William H. Lipscomb, Tong Zhang, Douglas Jacobsen, Irina Tezaur, Andrew G. Salinger, Raymond Tuminaro, and Luca Bertagna

Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) is a widely used hydrologic model. This paper documents the development of VIC version 5, which includes a reconfiguration of the model source code to support a wider range of modeling applications. It also represents a significant step forward for the VIC user community in terms of support for a range of modeling applications, reproducibility, and scientific robustness.

Joseph J. Hamman, Bart Nijssen, Theodore J. Bohn, Diana R. Gergel, and Yixin Mao

Global overviews of upcoming flood and drought events are key for many applications from agriculture to disaster risk reduction. Seasonal forecasts are designed to provide early indications of such events weeks or even months in advance. This paper introduces GloFAS-Seasonal, the first operational global-scale seasonal hydro-meteorological forecasting system producing openly available forecasts of high and low river flow out to 4 months ahead.

Rebecca Emerton, Ervin Zsoter, Louise Arnal, Hannah L. Cloke, Davide Muraro, Christel Prudhomme, Elisabeth M. Stephens, Peter Salamon, and Florian Pappenberger

Weather and climate models consist of complex software evolving in response to both scientific requirements and changing computing hardware. After years of relatively stable hardware, more diversity is arriving. It is possible that this hardware diversity and the pace of change may lead to an inability for modelling groups to manage their software development. This "chasm" between aspiration and reality may need to be bridged by large community efforts rather than traditional "in-house" efforts.

Bryan N. Lawrence, Michael Rezny, Reinhard Budich, Peter Bauer, Jörg Behrens, Mick Carter, Willem Deconinck, Rupert Ford, Christopher Maynard, Steven Mullerworth, Carlos Osuna, Andrew Porter, Kim Serradell, Sophie Valcke, Nils Wedi, and Simon Wilson

Recent articles

News
New Journal Impact Factors released 27 Jun 2018

The latest Journal Citation Reports® have been published by Clarivate Analytics.

Extended agreement with the Leibniz Association 03 May 2018

As of 1 May 2018 the centralized payment of article processing charges (APCs) with the Leibniz Association has been extended to 53 Leibniz Institutions participating in the Leibniz Association's Open Access Publishing Fund.

Winners of the GMD Fortran 77 contest confirmed 27 Apr 2018

The GMD Fortran 77 contest has finished. Ten people from Australia, Brasil, Britain, France, Germany, Japan, Spain, and Taiwan participated. Most supplied the correct answer 42 (of course) but 47, 53, and 64 were also suggested. Congratulations to all who found the correct solution! A detailed explanation why the FORTRAN77 code of the riddle does what it does can be found here: http://www.rolf-sander.net/res/solution.pdf

Publications Copernicus