Journal cover Journal topic
Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
GMD cover
Executive editors:
Julia
 
Hargreaves
,
Lutz
 
Gross
,
David
 
Ham
,
Astrid
 
Kerkweg
,
Didier
 
Roche
 &
Rolf
 
Sander
Geoscientific Model Development (GMD) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and public discussion of the description, development, and evaluation of numerical models of the Earth system and its components. The following manuscript types can be considered for peer-reviewed publication:
  • geoscientific model descriptions, from statistical models to box models to GCMs;
  • development and technical papers, describing developments such as new parameterizations or technical aspects of running models such as the reproducibility of results;
  • new methods for assessment of models, including work on developing new metrics for assessing model performance and novel ways of comparing model results with observational data;
  • papers describing new standard experiments for assessing model performance or novel ways of comparing model results with observational data;
  • model experiment descriptions, including experimental details and project protocols;
  • full evaluations of previously published models.

More details can be found in manuscript types and the journal editorial (compiled by the executive editors).

"I believe that the time is ripe for significantly better documentation of programs, and that we can best achieve this by considering programs to be works of literature." (Donald E. Knuth, Literate Programming, 1984)

"Essentially, all models are wrong, but some are useful." (George E. P. Box, Robustness in the strategy of scientific model building, 1979)

Highlight articles

Weather and climate models consist of complex software evolving in response to both scientific requirements and changing computing hardware. After years of relatively stable hardware, more diversity is arriving. It is possible that this hardware diversity and the pace of change may lead to an inability for modelling groups to manage their software development. This "chasm" between aspiration and reality may need to be bridged by large community efforts rather than traditional "in-house" efforts.

Bryan N. Lawrence, Michael Rezny, Reinhard Budich, Peter Bauer, Jörg Behrens, Mick Carter, Willem Deconinck, Rupert Ford, Christopher Maynard, Steven Mullerworth, Carlos Osuna, Andrew Porter, Kim Serradell, Sophie Valcke, Nils Wedi, and Simon Wilson

The best hope for reducing long-standing uncertainties in climate projections is through increasing the horizontal resolution of climate models to the kilometer scale. We establish a baseline of what it would take to do such simulations using an atmospheric model that has been adapted to run on a supercomputer accelerated with graphics processing units. To our knowledge this represents the first production-ready atmospheric model being run entirely on accelerators on this scale.

Oliver Fuhrer, Tarun Chadha, Torsten Hoefler, Grzegorz Kwasniewski, Xavier Lapillonne, David Leutwyler, Daniel Lüthi, Carlos Osuna, Christoph Schär, Thomas C. Schulthess, and Hannes Vogt

Model intercomparison studies in the climate and Earth sciences communities have been crucial for strengthening future projections. Given the speed and magnitude of anthropogenic change in the marine environment, the time is ripe for similar comparisons among models of fisheries and marine ecosystems. We describe the Fisheries and Marine Ecosystem Model Intercomparison Project, which brings together the marine ecosystem modelling community to inform long-term projections of marine ecosystems.

Derek P. Tittensor, Tyler D. Eddy, Heike K. Lotze, Eric D. Galbraith, William Cheung, Manuel Barange, Julia L. Blanchard, Laurent Bopp, Andrea Bryndum-Buchholz, Matthias Büchner, Catherine Bulman, David A. Carozza, Villy Christensen, Marta Coll, John P. Dunne, Jose A. Fernandes, Elizabeth A. Fulton, Alistair J. Hobday, Veronika Huber, Simon Jennings, Miranda Jones, Patrick Lehodey, Jason S. Link, Steve Mackinson, Olivier Maury, Susa Niiranen, Ricardo Oliveros-Ramos, Tilla Roy, Jacob Schewe, Yunne-Jai Shin, Tiago Silva, Charles A. Stock, Jeroen Steenbeek, Philip J. Underwood, Jan Volkholz, James R. Watson, and Nicola D. Walker

MetROMS and FESOM are two ocean/sea-ice models which resolve Antarctic ice-shelf cavities and consider thermodynamics at the ice-shelf base. We simulate the period 1992–2016 with both models, and with two options for resolution in FESOM, and compare output from the three simulations. Ice-shelf melt rates, sub-ice-shelf circulation, continental shelf water masses, and sea-ice processes are compared and evaluated against available observations.

Kaitlin A. Naughten, Katrin J. Meissner, Benjamin K. Galton-Fenzi, Matthew H. England, Ralph Timmermann, Hartmut H. Hellmer, Tore Hattermann, and Jens B. Debernard

In the real world the atmosphere, oceans and land surface are closely interconnected, and yet prediction systems tend to treat them in isolation. Those feedbacks are often illustrated in natural hazards, such as when strong winds lead to large waves and coastal damage, or when prolonged rainfall leads to saturated ground and high flowing rivers. For the first time, we have attempted to represent some of the feedbacks between sky, sea and land within a high-resolution forecast system for the UK.

Huw W. Lewis, Juan Manuel Castillo Sanchez, Jennifer Graham, Andrew Saulter, Jorge Bornemann, Alex Arnold, Joachim Fallmann, Chris Harris, David Pearson, Steven Ramsdale, Alberto Martínez-de la Torre, Lucy Bricheno, Eleanor Blyth, Victoria A. Bell, Helen Davies, Toby R. Marthews, Clare O'Neill, Heather Rumbold, Enda O'Dea, Ashley Brereton, Karen Guihou, Adrian Hines, Momme Butenschon, Simon J. Dadson, Tamzin Palmer, Jason Holt, Nick Reynard, Martin Best, John Edwards, and John Siddorn

Recent articles

News
Extended agreement with the Leibniz Association 03 May 2018

As of 1 May 2018 the centralized payment of article processing charges (APCs) with the Leibniz Association has been extended to 53 Leibniz Institutions participating in the Leibniz Association's Open Access Publishing Fund.

Winners of the GMD Fortran 77 contest confirmed 27 Apr 2018

The GMD Fortran 77 contest has finished. Ten people from Australia, Brasil, Britain, France, Germany, Japan, Spain, and Taiwan participated. Most supplied the correct answer 42 (of course) but 47, 53, and 64 were also suggested. Congratulations to all who found the correct solution! A detailed explanation why the FORTRAN77 code of the riddle does what it does can be found here: http://www.rolf-sander.net/res/solution.pdf

Celebrating 10 years of Geoscientific Model Development 09 Apr 2018

The first volume of GMD was published 10 years ago, in 2008. Join us to celebrate our anniversary during the EGU General Assembly 2018 in Vienna: Monday, 9 April at 19:00 (PICO spot 5a in hall X5).

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