Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 4.252 IF 4.252
  • IF 5-year value: 4.890 IF 5-year 4.890
  • CiteScore value: 4.49 CiteScore 4.49
  • SNIP value: 1.539 SNIP 1.539
  • SJR value: 2.404 SJR 2.404
  • IPP value: 4.28 IPP 4.28
  • h5-index value: 40 h5-index 40
  • Scimago H index value: 51 Scimago H index 51

Highlight articles

In the same way that the fruit fly or the yeast cell serve as model systems in biology, climate scientists use a range of computer models to gain a fundamental understanding of our climate system. These models range from extremely simple models that can run on your phone to those that require supercomputers. Sympl and climt are packages that make it easy for climate scientists to build a hierarchy of such models using Python, which facilitates easy to read and self-documenting models.

Joy Merwin Monteiro, Jeremy McGibbon, and Rodrigo Caballero

MPAS-Albany Land Ice (MALI) is a new variable-resolution land ice model that uses unstructured grids on a plane or sphere. MALI is built for Earth system modeling on high-performance computing platforms using existing software libraries. MALI simulates the evolution of ice thickness, velocity, and temperature, and it includes schemes for simulating iceberg calving and the flow of water beneath ice sheets and its effect on ice sliding. The model is demonstrated for the Antarctic ice sheet.

Matthew J. Hoffman, Mauro Perego, Stephen F. Price, William H. Lipscomb, Tong Zhang, Douglas Jacobsen, Irina Tezaur, Andrew G. Salinger, Raymond Tuminaro, and Luca Bertagna

Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) is a widely used hydrologic model. This paper documents the development of VIC version 5, which includes a reconfiguration of the model source code to support a wider range of modeling applications. It also represents a significant step forward for the VIC user community in terms of support for a range of modeling applications, reproducibility, and scientific robustness.

Joseph J. Hamman, Bart Nijssen, Theodore J. Bohn, Diana R. Gergel, and Yixin Mao

Global overviews of upcoming flood and drought events are key for many applications from agriculture to disaster risk reduction. Seasonal forecasts are designed to provide early indications of such events weeks or even months in advance. This paper introduces GloFAS-Seasonal, the first operational global-scale seasonal hydro-meteorological forecasting system producing openly available forecasts of high and low river flow out to 4 months ahead.

Rebecca Emerton, Ervin Zsoter, Louise Arnal, Hannah L. Cloke, Davide Muraro, Christel Prudhomme, Elisabeth M. Stephens, Peter Salamon, and Florian Pappenberger

Weather and climate models consist of complex software evolving in response to both scientific requirements and changing computing hardware. After years of relatively stable hardware, more diversity is arriving. It is possible that this hardware diversity and the pace of change may lead to an inability for modelling groups to manage their software development. This "chasm" between aspiration and reality may need to be bridged by large community efforts rather than traditional "in-house" efforts.

Bryan N. Lawrence, Michael Rezny, Reinhard Budich, Peter Bauer, Jörg Behrens, Mick Carter, Willem Deconinck, Rupert Ford, Christopher Maynard, Steven Mullerworth, Carlos Osuna, Andrew Porter, Kim Serradell, Sophie Valcke, Nils Wedi, and Simon Wilson

The best hope for reducing long-standing uncertainties in climate projections is through increasing the horizontal resolution of climate models to the kilometer scale. We establish a baseline of what it would take to do such simulations using an atmospheric model that has been adapted to run on a supercomputer accelerated with graphics processing units. To our knowledge this represents the first production-ready atmospheric model being run entirely on accelerators on this scale.

Oliver Fuhrer, Tarun Chadha, Torsten Hoefler, Grzegorz Kwasniewski, Xavier Lapillonne, David Leutwyler, Daniel Lüthi, Carlos Osuna, Christoph Schär, Thomas C. Schulthess, and Hannes Vogt

Model intercomparison studies in the climate and Earth sciences communities have been crucial for strengthening future projections. Given the speed and magnitude of anthropogenic change in the marine environment, the time is ripe for similar comparisons among models of fisheries and marine ecosystems. We describe the Fisheries and Marine Ecosystem Model Intercomparison Project, which brings together the marine ecosystem modelling community to inform long-term projections of marine ecosystems.

Derek P. Tittensor, Tyler D. Eddy, Heike K. Lotze, Eric D. Galbraith, William Cheung, Manuel Barange, Julia L. Blanchard, Laurent Bopp, Andrea Bryndum-Buchholz, Matthias Büchner, Catherine Bulman, David A. Carozza, Villy Christensen, Marta Coll, John P. Dunne, Jose A. Fernandes, Elizabeth A. Fulton, Alistair J. Hobday, Veronika Huber, Simon Jennings, Miranda Jones, Patrick Lehodey, Jason S. Link, Steve Mackinson, Olivier Maury, Susa Niiranen, Ricardo Oliveros-Ramos, Tilla Roy, Jacob Schewe, Yunne-Jai Shin, Tiago Silva, Charles A. Stock, Jeroen Steenbeek, Philip J. Underwood, Jan Volkholz, James R. Watson, and Nicola D. Walker

MetROMS and FESOM are two ocean/sea-ice models which resolve Antarctic ice-shelf cavities and consider thermodynamics at the ice-shelf base. We simulate the period 1992–2016 with both models, and with two options for resolution in FESOM, and compare output from the three simulations. Ice-shelf melt rates, sub-ice-shelf circulation, continental shelf water masses, and sea-ice processes are compared and evaluated against available observations.

Kaitlin A. Naughten, Katrin J. Meissner, Benjamin K. Galton-Fenzi, Matthew H. England, Ralph Timmermann, Hartmut H. Hellmer, Tore Hattermann, and Jens B. Debernard

In the real world the atmosphere, oceans and land surface are closely interconnected, and yet prediction systems tend to treat them in isolation. Those feedbacks are often illustrated in natural hazards, such as when strong winds lead to large waves and coastal damage, or when prolonged rainfall leads to saturated ground and high flowing rivers. For the first time, we have attempted to represent some of the feedbacks between sky, sea and land within a high-resolution forecast system for the UK.

Huw W. Lewis, Juan Manuel Castillo Sanchez, Jennifer Graham, Andrew Saulter, Jorge Bornemann, Alex Arnold, Joachim Fallmann, Chris Harris, David Pearson, Steven Ramsdale, Alberto Martínez-de la Torre, Lucy Bricheno, Eleanor Blyth, Victoria A. Bell, Helen Davies, Toby R. Marthews, Clare O'Neill, Heather Rumbold, Enda O'Dea, Ashley Brereton, Karen Guihou, Adrian Hines, Momme Butenschon, Simon J. Dadson, Tamzin Palmer, Jason Holt, Nick Reynard, Martin Best, John Edwards, and John Siddorn

Rivers control the movement of sediment and nutrients across Earth's surface. Understanding how rivers change through time is important for mitigating natural hazards and predicting Earth's response to climate change. We develop a new computer model for predicting how rivers cut through sediment and rock. Our model is designed to be joined with models of flooding, landslides, vegetation change, and other factors to provide a comprehensive toolbox for predicting changes to the landscape.

Charles M. Shobe, Gregory E. Tucker, and Katherine R. Barnhart

Atmospheric dynamical cores are a fundamental component of global atmospheric modeling systems and are responsible for capturing the dynamical behavior of the Earth's atmosphere. To better understand modern dynamical cores, this paper aims to provide a comprehensive review of 11 dynamical cores, drawn from modeling centers and groups that participated in the 2016 Dynamical Core Model Intercomparison Project (DCMIP) workshop and summer school.

Paul A. Ullrich, Christiane Jablonowski, James Kent, Peter H. Lauritzen, Ramachandran Nair, Kevin A. Reed, Colin M. Zarzycki, David M. Hall, Don Dazlich, Ross Heikes, Celal Konor, David Randall, Thomas Dubos, Yann Meurdesoif, Xi Chen, Lucas Harris, Christian Kühnlein, Vivian Lee, Abdessamad Qaddouri, Claude Girard, Marco Giorgetta, Daniel Reinert, Joseph Klemp, Sang-Hun Park, William Skamarock, Hiroaki Miura, Tomoki Ohno, Ryuji Yoshida, Robert Walko, Alex Reinecke, and Kevin Viner

We provide the experimental designs and protocols for a community experiment to compare radiative transfer codes used for past climate on Earth, and for exoplanets.

Colin Goldblatt, Lucas Kavanagh, and Maura Dewey

A global aerosol reanalysis product named the Japanese Reanalysis for Aerosol (JRAero) was constructed by the Meteorological Research Institute (MRI) of the Japan Meteorological Agency. The reanalysis employs a global aerosol transport model developed by MRI and a two-dimensional variational data assimilation method. It assimilates maps of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from MODIS onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites every 6 h and has a TL159 horizontal resolution (approximately 1.1°×1.1°).

Keiya Yumimoto, Taichu Y. Tanaka, Naga Oshima, and Takashi Maki

The CarbonTracker Data Assimilation Shell (CTDAS) is the new modular implementation of the CarbonTracker Europe (CTE) data assimilation system. We present and document CTDAS and demonstrate its ability to estimate global carbon sources and sinks. We present the latest CTE results including the distribution of the carbon sinks over the hemispheres and between the land biosphere and the oceans. We show the versatility of CTDAS with an overview of the wide range of other applications.

Ingrid T. van der Laan-Luijkx, Ivar R. van der Velde, Emma van der Veen, Aki Tsuruta, Karolina Stanislawska, Arne Babenhauserheide, Hui Fang Zhang, Yu Liu, Wei He, Huilin Chen, Kenneth A. Masarie, Maarten C. Krol, and Wouter Peters

The Polar SWIFT model is a fast scheme for calculating the chemistry of stratospheric ozone depletion in polar winter. It is intended for use in global climate models (GCMs) and Earth system models (ESMs) to enable the simulation of mutual interactions between the ozone layer and climate.

Ingo Wohltmann, Ralph Lehmann, and Markus Rex

As part of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) organized under the auspices of the World Climate Research Programme's (WCRP) Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM) many hundreds of climate researchers, working with modeling centres around the world, will share, compare and analyze the latest outcomes of global climate models. These model products will fuel climate research for the next 5 to 10 years, while its careful analysis will form the basis for future climate assessments and negotiations.

David Carlson, Veronika Eyring, Narelle van der Wel, and Gaby Langendijk

Our ability to model the chemical and thermodynamic processes that lead to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation is thought to be hampered by the complexity of the system. In this proof of concept study, the ability to train supervised methods to predict electron impact ionisation (EI) mass spectra for the AMS is evaluated to facilitate improved model evaluation. The study demonstrates the use of a methodology that would be improved with more training data and data from simple mixed systems.

David O. Topping, James Allan, M. Rami Alfarra, and Bernard Aumont

Earth's terrestrial surface influences climate by exchanging carbon and water with the atmosphere through stomatal pores. However, most land-surface models, used to predict global carbon and water fluxes, estimate that water lost through stomata is less than what observations show. In this study, we integrate plant water loss data from 204 species into a global land surface model, finding that global estimates of plant water loss increase, soil moisture decreases, and carbon gain also decreases.

Danica L. Lombardozzi, Melanie J. B. Zeppel, Rosie A. Fisher, and Ahmed Tawfik

We developed a plant hydraulics model for tropical forests based on established plant physiological theory, and parameterized it by conducting a pantropical hydraulic trait survey. We show that a substantial amount of trait diversity can be represented in the model by a reduced set of trait dimensions. The fully parameterized model is able capture tree-level variation in water status and improves simulations of total ecosystem transpiration, showing how to incorporate hydraulic traits in models.

Bradley O. Christoffersen, Manuel Gloor, Sophie Fauset, Nikolaos M. Fyllas, David R. Galbraith, Timothy R. Baker, Bart Kruijt, Lucy Rowland, Rosie A. Fisher, Oliver J. Binks, Sanna Sevanto, Chonggang Xu, Steven Jansen, Brendan Choat, Maurizio Mencuccini, Nate G. McDowell, and Patrick Meir

This study compares the 20th century multi-annual climate variability modes in reanalysis data sets (ERA-20C and 20CR) and 12 climate model simulations using the randomised multi-channel singular spectrum analysis. The reanalysis data sets are remarkably similar on all timescales, except that the spectral power in ERA-20C is systematically slightly higher than in 20CR. None of the climate models closely reproduce all aspects of the reanalysis spectra, although many aspects are represented well.

Heikki Järvinen, Teija Seitola, Johan Silén, and Jouni Räisänen

This paper analyses methods to assimilate chemical measurements in air quality models. We developed a reduced-order atmospheric chemistry model, which was used to compare results from different assimilation algorithms. Using an ensemble variational method (4DEnVar), we exploited the dynamical information provided by hourly measurements of chemical concentrations to diagnose model biases and improve next-day forecasts for several species of interest for air quality.

Emanuele Emili, Selime Gürol, and Daniel Cariolle

This paper tells why to launch the Global Monsoons Model Inter-comparison Project (GMMIP) and how to achieve its scientific goals on monsoon variability. It addresses the scientific questions to be answered, describes three tiered experiments comprehensively and proposes a basic analysis framework to guide future research. It will help the monsoon research communities to understand the objectives of the GMMIP and the modelling groups involved in the GMMIP conduct the experiments successfully.

Tianjun Zhou, Andrew G. Turner, James L. Kinter, Bin Wang, Yun Qian, Xiaolong Chen, Bo Wu, Bin Wang, Bo Liu, Liwei Zou, and Bian He

The Water Futures and Solutions (WFaS) initiative coordinates its work with other ongoing scenario efforts for the sake of establishing a consistent set of new global water scenarios based on the shared socio-economic pathways (SSPs) and the representative concentration pathways (RCPs). The WFaS "fast-track" assessment uses three global water models, H08, PCR-GLOBWB, and WaterGAP, to provide the first multi-model analysis of global water use for the 21st century based on the water scenarios.

Y. Wada, M. Flörke, N. Hanasaki, S. Eisner, G. Fischer, S. Tramberend, Y. Satoh, M. T. H. van Vliet, P. Yillia, C. Ringler, P. Burek, and D. Wiberg

This study presents the inclusion of 10 Mediterranean agricultural plants in an agro-ecosystem model (LPJmL): nut trees, date palms, citrus trees, orchards, olive trees, grapes, cotton, potatoes, vegetables and fodder grasses. The model was successfully tested in three model outputs: agricultural yields, irrigation requirements and soil carbon density. With this development presented, LPJmL is now able to simulate in good detail and mechanistically the functioning of Mediterranean agriculture.

M. Fader, W. von Bloh, S. Shi, A. Bondeau, and W. Cramer

The ECCO v4 non-linear inverse modeling framework and its reference solution are made publicly available. The inverse estimate of ocean physics and atmospheric forcing yields a dynamically consistent and global state estimate without unidentified sources of heat and salt that closely fits in situ and satellite data. Any user can reproduce it accurately. Parametric and external model uncertainties are of comparable magnitudes and generally exceed structural model uncertainties.

G. Forget, J. M. Campin, P. Heimbach, C. N. Hill, R. M. Ponte, and C. Wunsch

In this paper, we redesign the mpiPOM with GPUs. Specifically, we first convert the model from its original Fortran form to a new CUDA-C version, POM.gpu-v1.0. Then we optimize the code on each of the GPUs, the communications between the GPUs, and the I/O between the GPUs and the CPUs. We show that the performance of the new model on a workstation containing 4 GPUs is comparable to that on a powerful cluster with 408 standard CPU cores, and it reduces the energy consumption by a factor of 6.8.

S. H. Xu, X. M. Huang, Y. Zhang, H. H. Fu, L. Y. Oey, F. H. Xu, and G. W. Yang

Ecosystem models provide a powerful tool for simulating ocean biology. Care must be exercised when selecting appropriate equations and parameter values to represent chosen marine ecosystems. Here, we present an efficient plankton model testbed, using simplified physics and coded in the freely available language R. Multiple runs can be undertaken for different ocean sites, permitting thorough evaluation of ecosystem model performance. The testbed also serves as an excellent resource for teaching.

T.R. Anderson, W.C. Gentleman, and A. Yool

The natural abundance of 14C in CO2 dissolved in seawater is often used to evaluate circulation and age in the ocean and in ocean models. We study limitations of using natural 14C to determine the time elapsed since water had contact with the atmosphere. We find that, globally, bulk 14C age is dominated by two equally important components, (1) the time component of circulation and (2) the “preformed 14C-age”. Considering preformed 14C-age is critical for an assessment of circulation in models.

W. Koeve, H. Wagner, P. Kähler, and A. Oschlies

We present a new approach to assess karstic groundwater recharge over Europe and the Mediterranean. Cluster analysis is used to subdivide all karst regions into four typical karst landscapes and to simulate karst recharge with a process-based karst model. We estimate its parameters by a combination of a priori information and observations of soil moisture and evapotranspiration. Independent observations of recharge that present large-scale models significantly under-estimate karstic recharge.

A. Hartmann, T. Gleeson, R. Rosolem, F. Pianosi, Y. Wada, and T. Wagener

We provide improved routines to model the ocean carbonate system, i.e., to compute ocean pH and related variables from dissolved inorganic carbon and total alkalinity. These routines (1) rely on the fastest available algorithm to solve the alkalinity-pH equation, which converges even under extreme conditions; (2) avoid common model approximations that lead to errors of 3% or more in computed variables; and (3) account for large pressure effects on subsurface pCO2, unlike other packages.

J. C. Orr and J.-M. Epitalon

This paper explores the feasibility of an experimentation strategy for investigating sensitivities in fast components of atmospheric general circulation models.

H. Wan, P. J. Rasch, K. Zhang, Y. Qian, H. Yan, and C. Zhao

We present a new coupled ocean-circulation–ice model configuration of the Baltic Sea. The model features, contrary to most existing configurations, a high horizontal resolution of 1 nautical mile (1.85 km), which is eddy-resolving over much of the domain.

H. Dietze, U. Löptien, and K. Getzlaff

Publications Copernicus