Journal cover Journal topic
Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 6.086 IF 6.086
  • IF 5-year<br/> value: 6.174 IF 5-year
    6.174
  • SNIP value: 1.812 SNIP 1.812
  • IPP value: 5.140 IPP 5.140
  • SJR value: 3.969 SJR 3.969
  • h5-index value: 29 h5-index 29
GMD cover
Executive editors:
Julia
 
Hargreaves
,
Astrid
 
Kerkweg
,
Dan
 
Lunt
,
Robert
 
Marsh
,
Andy
 
Ridgwell
,
Didier
 
Roche
,
Ian
 
Rutt
 &
Rolf
 
Sander

Geoscientific Model Development (GMD) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and public discussion of the description, development, and evaluation of numerical models of the Earth system and its components. The following manuscript types can be considered for peer-reviewed publication:

  • geoscientific model descriptions, from box models to GCMs;
  • development and technical papers, describing development such as new parameterizations or technical aspects of running models such as the reproducibility of results;
  • papers describing new standard experiments for assessing model performance, or novel ways of comparing model results with observational data;
  • model intercomparison descriptions, including experimental details and project protocols.

News

Website relaunch

17 Mar 2015

The GMD website has been given a new look, and the navigation has been adjusted.
Further details:

TU Delft and Copernicus Publications cooperate in supporting open access

22 Jan 2015

In order to further promote open access, the TU Delft Library has transferred a budget to Copernicus to be used by its scientists in 2015.

Central billing of APCs for TUM authors

18 Dec 2014

Copernicus Publications and the University Library of the Technical University Munich (TUM) have agreed on central billing of article processing charges.

Recent articles

Highlight articles

We provide improved routines to model the ocean carbonate system, i.e., to compute ocean pH and related variables from dissolved inorganic carbon and total alkalinity. These routines (1) rely on the fastest available algorithm to solve the alkalinity-pH equation, which converges even under extreme conditions; (2) avoid common model approximations that lead to errors of 3% or more in computed variables; and (3) account for large pressure effects on subsurface pCO2, unlike other packages.

J. C. Orr and J.-M. Epitalon

Publications Copernicus